Hearth Tax - Michaelmas 1673

The Hearth Tax (Chimney Tax or Chimney Money) was introduced as one of several taxes to attempt to provide an income for Charles II.

The Hearth Tax was a very unpopular tax, particularly after officials were given the power to enter and search properties.  Occupiers were taxed at a rate of two shillings per hearth, paid equally at Lady Day (25th March) and Michaelmas (29th September).  Poor people were particularly hard hit by the tax and it was later changed so that the very poorest did not pay.

The Hearth Tax Online Project  states that

“For all economic and social historians of Britain in the early modern period, the hearth tax is a remarkable source. Between 1662 and 1689 central government imposed a levy on all householders across England, Wales and Ireland measured in terms of the number of hearths in each property. The surviving accounts of the hearth tax are substantial, and provide one of the most detailed, comprehensive and instructive sources of information that we possess on the people of Britain and Ireland before the first National Census (1801)”.

This project has transcripts of the number of hearths in County Durham on Lady Day 1666.

Hearth Tax for Boldron (Bowram) - Michaelmas 1673

Hearth Tax for Boldron – Michaelmas 1673

Name of Householder

Number of Hearths

Lyonell Metcalfe

3

Geo Clarkson

2

Ja Richardson

3

Ra Harker

1

Jo Thompson

1

Tho Newton

1

Edw Newton

1

Tho Copeland

1

Ra Loadman

1

Tho Appleby

1

Jo Bainbrigg

1

Jo Clarkson

1

Wm Thompson

1

Jo Langstaffe

1

Tho Whorton

2

Jo Whorton

2

Anne Mitchelfe

1

Tho Akin

2

Wm Coates

1

Ra Binkes

1

Tho Newton

1

Ja Binkes

1

 

 

 

30

 

 

Discharged per legall cert

 

Anne Thompson

1

Roger Clarkson

1

Geo Harker

1

Math Clarkson

1

Mary Brench

1

Chr Finley

1

Wm Jamson

1

Grace Harker

1

Margt Clarkson

1

Wm Richardson

1

 

 

 

10

Ref: The National Archives E179/216/462